Why Deep Sleep Matters and How to Get More Deep Sleep

how to get more deep sleep

We all know how card it can be to pull ourselves away from a good Netflix series or scrolling through our phones. However, deep sleep (one of the four sleep stages) is one powerful reason to stop late night shopping and get some ZZ’s. Also known as slow-wave sleep, deep sleep is characterized by slow brain waves and complete relaxation of the body. During this stage, our body repairs and regenerates, while our brain consolidates memories and processes information. Getting enough deep sleep is essential for our physical and mental well-being, and neglecting it can have serious consequences. In this blog post, we will explore the importance of deep sleep, its impact on our health, and some tips to improve deep sleep for a better sleep health. Let's dive into the world of deep sleep and discover how we can improve our sleep one night at a time.

What is Deep Sleep? 

what is deep sleep

Deep sleep, also known as slow-wave sleep, is a critical stage of our sleep cycle. It is characterized by slow brain waves (called delta waves) and complete relaxation of the body. Deep sleep usually occurs within an hour of falling asleep then reappears in shorter bouts as the night progresses. Overall, most adults spend about 20% of their slumber in deep sleep.  When we are in this phase of the sleep cycle our heart rate is low and our muscles are relaxed. Our body uses this time to undergo essential processes that contribute to our overall health and well-being.

Why Does Deep Sleep Matter? 

how much deep sleep should i get

Deep sleep matters because it is a vital stage of our sleep cycle that directly impacts our overall health and well-being. During deep sleep, our body undergoes crucial processes that contribute to our physical and mental restoration. Without enough deep sleep, we may experience a range of negative consequences.

One of the primary reasons deep sleep matters is its role in physical recovery. In this stage, our body repairs and regenerates tissues, strengthens the immune system, and replenishes energy levels. It plays a crucial role in physical recovery, making it essential for athletes and individuals with physically demanding lifestyles. Additionally, deep sleep is vital for cognitive functions such as memory consolidation and information processing. It helps solidify learning and enhance creativity.

When we enter deep sleep, our brain releases growth hormones that are essential for development, repair, and maintenance of body tissues. Deep sleep is particularly important for children and adolescents as it supports growth and development during these crucial stages.

As if that isn’t enough, deep sleep is also associated with the regulation of mood and emotions. Adequate deep sleep can help regulate emotions, improve mood, and reduce the risk of mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety.

As you can see, deep sleep is a crucial stage of our sleep cycle that supports both our physical and mental health. Neglecting deep sleep can lead to negative consequences such as decreased immune function, impaired memory, increased risk of chronic conditions, and mood disturbances. Thus, prioritizing deep sleep and adopting habits to improve its quality are essential for a better sleep health and overall well-being.

How Much Deep Sleep Do We Need? 

deep sleep

When it comes to deep sleep, one of the common questions that arises is, "How much deep sleep do we actually need?" The answer may vary depending on age, lifestyle, and individual differences. However, on average, adults need about 20% to 25% of their total sleep time in deep sleep. This translates to roughly 1.5 to 2 hours of deep sleep per night.

Children and adolescents require even more deep sleep, as it plays a crucial role in their growth and development. For infants, deep sleep makes up about 40% to 50% of their total sleep time. As children grow older, the amount of deep sleep gradually decreases, but it remains a vital stage for their physical and cognitive development.

It's important to note that these numbers are general guidelines and may vary from person to person. Some individuals may naturally require more or less deep sleep depending on their individual needs and health conditions.

To ensure you're getting enough deep sleep, it's crucial to establish a regular sleep schedule and create a sleep-friendly environment. By going to bed and waking up at consistent times and optimizing your sleep environment, you can increase the chances of getting the recommended amount of deep sleep.

Remember, quality is just as (if not more) important as quantity when it comes to deep sleep. Prioritizing sleep and creating healthy sleep habits will not only help you get enough deep sleep but also improve the overall quality of your sleep. If you are looking to keep tabs on your sleep quantity and quality while at home, consider a wearable device such as a WHOOP or OURA Ring. Aim for a balanced sleep routine that includes both enough total sleep time and sufficient deep sleep to promote optimal health and well-being.

Factors that Affect Deep Sleep Quality 

what impacts sleep quality

Several factors can influence the quality of deep sleep we experience each night.

  1. Sleep Environment: Creating a sleep-friendly environment is crucial for quality deep sleep. Factors such as noise, temperature, light, and comfort can significantly impact our ability to fall into deep sleep and stay there. Make sure your bedroom is quiet, dark, and at a comfortable temperature to promote optimal deep sleep.
  2. Stress and Anxiety: High levels of stress and anxiety can disrupt many aspects of our lives and deep sleep is no exception. While it’s easy to say, “relax,” finding a strategy that suits our individual circumstances can be challenging. It may take a bit of experimentation try some relaxation techniques to reduce stress and promote a calm mind before bed. Engaging in activities like meditation, deep breathing exercises, or journaling can help calm the mind and prepare it for a restful night's sleep.
  3. Caffeine and Alcohol Consumption: Consuming caffeine or alcohol close to bedtime can interfere with deep sleep. Both substances can disrupt the sleep cycle, making it difficult to achieve and maintain deep sleep. Avoid consuming caffeine and alcohol in the hours leading up to bedtime to ensure a higher quality of deep sleep.
  4. Electronic Devices: The blue light emitted by electronic devices like smartphones, tablets, and laptops can suppress the production of melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep. Try to avoid using electronic devices at least an hour before bed to promote better deep sleep.
  5. Sleep Disorders: Certain sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea and insomnia, can negatively affect deep sleep. If you (or your sleep partner) suspect you have a sleep disorder, it's essential to consult with a healthcare professional who can diagnose and provide appropriate treatment.

By addressing these factors and making necessary changes, we can optimize our sleep environment and promote better deep sleep quality. Remember, consistent and healthy sleep habits are key to improving our sleep health one night at a time.

Tips for Improving Deep Sleep 

get more deep sleep

Making a few small adjustments to our daily routine can have a significant impact on how we feel upon waking.  If you're looking to improve your deep sleep, here are some tips to help you get started:

  1. Establish a Regular Sleep Schedule: Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, even on weekends. This helps regulate your body's internal clock and can promote more consistent deep sleep.
  2. Create a Sleep-Friendly Environment: Make sure your bedroom is dark, quiet, and at a comfortable temperature. Use blackout curtains, earplugs, or a white noise machine if necessary to block out any disturbances that could disrupt your deep sleep. If you live in a dry environment, consider adding a humidifier to help increase the quality of your sleep.
  3. Limit Exposure to Electronic Devices Before Bed: The blue light emitted by smartphones, tablets, and laptops can interfere with the production of melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep. Try to avoid using these devices at least an hour before bed to promote better deep sleep.
  4. Manage Stress and Anxiety: While you don’t have to count sleep to relax, developing your own relaxation technique before bed can help your body relax into deep sleep: try meditation, deep breathing exercises, or journaling. These activities can help calm your mind and prepare it for a restful night's sleep.
  5. Avoid Caffeine and Alcohol Close to Bedtime: Both caffeine and alcohol can interfere with your sleep cycle, making it harder to achieve and maintain deep sleep. Avoid consuming these substances in the hours leading up to bedtime.
  6. Exercise Regularly: Regular exercise has been shown to improve sleep latency, sleep quality, and deep sleep. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week, but try to avoid vigorous exercise close to bedtime, as it may energize your body and make it harder to fall asleep.
  7. Stick to a Healthy Diet: Avoid heavy meals and foods high in sugar or spicy foods before bed, as they can cause discomfort and disrupt sleep. Instead, opt for light snacks that won’t spike your blood sugar if you need something before bed.
  8. Try a Deep Sleep Supplement: There are a few natural supplements that have been shown to improve the quality of deep sleep. Valerian root, glycine, magnesium, and chamomile are a few options. Before staring any supplements be sure to consult with a healthcare professional.

Remember, improving deep sleep takes time and consistency. Try incorporating these tips into your daily routine and give your body and mind the opportunity to experience the restorative benefits of deep sleep. Sleep well and wake up refreshed!

Sweet Dreams Await: Closing Thoughts on Deep Sleep 

improve sleep quality

Deep sleep, also known as slow-wave sleep, is a vital stage of our sleep cycle that directly impacts our overall health and well-being. It is during this stage that our body repairs and regenerates, our brain consolidates memories, and our emotional well-being is regulated. Neglecting deep sleep can lead to a range of negative consequences, including decreased immune function, impaired memory, increased risk of chronic conditions, and mood disturbances.

To improve deep sleep, it is important to establish a regular sleep schedule, create a sleep-friendly environment, limit exposure to electronic devices before bed, manage stress and anxiety, avoid caffeine and alcohol close to bedtime, exercise regularly, and stick to a healthy diet. By incorporating these habits into our daily routine, we can increase the chances of getting enough deep sleep and improving the overall quality of our sleep.

Remember, improving deep sleep takes time and consistency. It is important to prioritize deep sleep and make it a priority in our lives. So, start implementing these tips tonight and enjoy the numerous benefits that deep sleep brings to your overall well-being. Sleep well and wake up refreshed, ready to conquer the day!

 

 

 

Author: Dr. Colleen Gulick